Isn’t It About Time for Sweat-Free Solar?

Ethical Solar Technology

Million Monarchs

Those of us concerned with human and environmental rights have advocated for fair-trade coffee, protested oil company environmental abuses, and marched against sweat shop labor in the apparel industry for years. But where is the “sweat-free” alternative when it comes to solar power and technology?

After all, solar power (and renewable energy) are the heartbeat of the sustainability movement. So shouldn’t they be sustainable?

At Million Monarchs, we sure think so – and it’s high time we consumers stepped up and made it happen.

Using Consumer Leverage to Encourage Transparent Supply Chains

When it comes to metals, mining, manufacturing and raw materials, the first step to addressing these issues is bringing them into the light to create consumer awareness of the problem. From there, we’ll need to push for socially and environmentally conscious alternatives that make solar and technology forces something to be truly proud of in the world.

Million Monarchs, Inc. is a Solar and Small Wind Company with a Social Mission. Together with the good people at the First Unitarian Church of Portland, we plan to raise money for a 20 kW solar installation, then use that money to reward the manufacturing company with the most TRANSPARENT SUPPLY CHAIN when it comes to metals, mining, manufacturing and raw materials.

Why? 
It doesn’t take much reading to find horrendous social and environmental issues in the tech world. From tantalum mining to sweat shop labor, things can be environmentally and socially difficult to stomach.

Oil alternatives are not automatically green – to make them so will take real work, research and consumer demand. You can check out our first attempt at www.rootsofgreen.org – log in and register your support.

Feel free to email me at sean@millionmonarchs.com with questions, or to contribute time or talents.

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Organization: Million Monarchs
Author: Sean Patrick
Website: http://rootsofgreen.org
Email: sean@millionmonarchs.com


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