Legacy Center Creates Extreme Giving Projects in North Carolina

Organization: The Legacy Center
Website:
www.extremegivers.com
Author: Lori Todd

Legacy Center in Morrisville, North Carolina is committed to empowering people to live free connected lives and make a difference as leaders in their communities. We believe that all people possess the desire and power to be extraordinary and to leave a unique legacy in the world. To manifest our stand we are leaders in personal development and leadership trainings. We are committed to our graduates being Extreme Givers in the world. Extreme givers are people who expand themselves past what is reasonably expected, handle extraordinary circumstances and obstacles, and live their vision in spite of naysayers.

The Leacy CenterAn extreme giving project is one that makes a significant contribution in the community.
It can take a maximum of three weeks to design.
It can only take two days to complete. Failure is not an option.
Budgets are a minimum of $20,000 up to over $50,000.
Participants cannot use their own money and must involve people in the community to do 75%of the work.

Our intention is to quickly sweep into a community, give them something extraordinary and empower community leaders. No matter what the obstacles, all projects are completed in excellence.
Projects can be in any domain including: children, family, environment, world peace, animals, youth, and senior citizens.

During the next year, Legacy Center Inc. (www.TheLegacyCenter.com) and Extreme Givers are committed to having ten extreme giving projects in the United States or abroad. Our intention is to give back to the world with projects that total $500,000 in the next year.

This will create leadership teams that get to stand outside the ordinary and experience the profound honor and energizing effect of being dedicated to a purpose bigger than themselves. People in the world can indeed stand in the impossible and make it happen.


  • http://www.legacycenterfoundation.org Nicole Gabriel

    I am a teenager and I was involved on one of these extreme giving Legacy Center Projects in North Carolina. This was a project from one of the adult leadership programs. It was amazing. Would you give kids in juvy a second chance? Maybe you wouldn’t and maybe you would. I once thought that kids in juvenile detention were bad, bad people. I watch law shows, you see, and I used to believe that these kids were worthless. But my mom took my brother and me to a juvenile detention area and immediately I found that it looks very different than I had seen on T.V. My mom brought us because she likes doing community service with Legacy Center. She told me that she thought that it would be a good “learning experience”. I explained that I was scared and nervous to be around people that committed crimes.

    “You’re even safer here then you are at your own school or in our neighborhood,” my mom said. This, of course, didn’t make me feel any better. I looked around at my surroundings while my mother chatted with a work friend. Ten foot high fences and barbed wire all around me. I suddenly felt like a prisoner myself. When I looked around and happened to catch a glimpse of the boys, I noticed they were all wearing uniforms and walking in something of a line. They didn’t strike me as dangerous so much as clueless or curious. I felt very outsider-ish like an explorer marveling at a large group of people that the world had never seen or noticed before. I just wanted to stare at them; examine them. Maybe I was thinking about how different they really are or maybe I was just trying to find something wrong with them.

    The group was going to build a dog agility course so that the juveniles could train dogs from the shelter and give them obedience classes so the animals would be more adoptable. The boys were helping build the fenced area and the training equipment and the next day, when it was complete, everyone celebrated with pizza and soft drinks. The woman in charge of the event gave a speech about every individual that helped and she started talking about the supervisor of the boys that helped with the project. The woman said,

    “Let’s give it up for Mr. Jones*! I was talkin’ to him and I asked him if he was proud of his boys and do you know what he said? He said he is always proud of them.” This touched my heart and really made me think. I thought about these kids, all around the world. Some are in jail for things that maybe they didn’t even rightfully deserve. The one thing that made me feel safe at the beginning of the trip was having my mom close by. These kids don’t even have the reassurance of a parent to back them up or make them feel better when they’re sad or scared.

    Anybody and everybody, deserves a second chance and we should all accept others. I’m glad I had an opportunity to learn this very important lesson.

  • http://www.legacycenterfoundation.org Nicole Gabriel

    I am a teenager and I was involved on one of these extreme giving Legacy Center Projects in North Carolina. This was a project from one of the adult leadership programs. It was amazing. Would you give kids in juvy a second chance? Maybe you wouldn’t and maybe you would. I once thought that kids in juvenile detention were bad, bad people. I watch law shows, you see, and I used to believe that these kids were worthless. But my mom took my brother and me to a juvenile detention area and immediately I found that it looks very different than I had seen on T.V. My mom brought us because she likes doing community service with Legacy Center. She told me that she thought that it would be a good “learning experience”. I explained that I was scared and nervous to be around people that committed crimes.

    “You’re even safer here then you are at your own school or in our neighborhood,” my mom said. This, of course, didn’t make me feel any better. I looked around at my surroundings while my mother chatted with a work friend. Ten foot high fences and barbed wire all around me. I suddenly felt like a prisoner myself. When I looked around and happened to catch a glimpse of the boys, I noticed they were all wearing uniforms and walking in something of a line. They didn’t strike me as dangerous so much as clueless or curious. I felt very outsider-ish like an explorer marveling at a large group of people that the world had never seen or noticed before. I just wanted to stare at them; examine them. Maybe I was thinking about how different they really are or maybe I was just trying to find something wrong with them.

    The group was going to build a dog agility course so that the juveniles could train dogs from the shelter and give them obedience classes so the animals would be more adoptable. The boys were helping build the fenced area and the training equipment and the next day, when it was complete, everyone celebrated with pizza and soft drinks. The woman in charge of the event gave a speech about every individual that helped and she started talking about the supervisor of the boys that helped with the project. The woman said,

    “Let’s give it up for Mr. Jones*! I was talkin’ to him and I asked him if he was proud of his boys and do you know what he said? He said he is always proud of them.” This touched my heart and really made me think. I thought about these kids, all around the world. Some are in jail for things that maybe they didn’t even rightfully deserve. The one thing that made me feel safe at the beginning of the trip was having my mom close by. These kids don’t even have the reassurance of a parent to back them up or make them feel better when they’re sad or scared.

    Anybody and everybody, deserves a second chance and we should all accept others. I’m glad I had an opportunity to learn this very important lesson.

  • http://www.google.com Leopoldo Liberati

    Just noticed a new chat site called Chat Spasm, a chat site with girls.

  • http://www.google.com Leopoldo Liberati

    Just noticed a new chat site called Chat Spasm, a chat site with girls.

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